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Suckers for the U.S.Aid

21 Aug

This just gives a reality check to many Egyptians calling for US aid to be cut off as if it is as easy as having some “courage” and an off-and-on button switch, well it is not that simple..
Sisi can’t afford to do so and this article explains why. Don’t hold so much hope in Sisi or SCAF for that matter, who already has military orders lined-up all until 2018, and “whose planes won’t fly and tanks won’t drive without that sustainment money that the $1.3 Billion allocates.”
For Egypt to be independent is for the revolution to win, and more importantly to spread. Relying on an army that has “neglected pilot training so badly that the Egyptian air force has one of the worst crash rates of any F-16 fleet in the world” won’t really “scare off” anyone, but us, the Egyptian people.

It is like a never ending abusive marriage, and we must break the cycle…

The Poster That Turned Facebook Yellow

18 Aug

An attempt of showing solidarity with Rabaa massacre, where army and police killed over 600 armed and unarmed protesters, Muslim Brotherhood supporters created a yellow poster showing a palm making the number four, which is because Rabaa also means the number four in Arabic. It only took few minutes that I started seeing some counter or response posters to the original one; some with a sense of humor about it, some are just attacking Rabaa and MB, and some are just because people are bored, and their creativity got the best of them being under curfew. It is snowballing to the point that just out of my timeline feed  on Facebook, I was able to put the gallery below together showing the different ones I found. I am sure there will be endless more. Here is a page full of them!

Photoshop, tragedy, and curfew don’t mix…

Sisi’s Mandate Death Toll

27 Jul

IMG_5803.jpg

Clashes at the Pro-Morsy sit-in in Rabaa resulted in at least 65 deaths (according to health ministry) and 100s injured from attacks by police using the usual excessive tear gas, live bullets, and birdshots, same as the police always used against revolutionaries in all massacres across the 2.5 years of the revolution. This time it came after a mandate “the people of Egypt” gave to Sisi measured by the mass demonstrations on 26 July, of which thankfully i refused to take part. It also came after Safwat Hegazy, one of the leaders at Rabaa sit-in decided to escalate the sit-in by taking it as far as the entrance of the 6 Oct Bridge on Nasr St building a rock wall to block the road pushing forward all the foot soldiers of the MB for the battle sacrificing as he was no where to be seen at the frontline of the battle field.

Even though MB have been in bed with SCAF and police especially in the year of Morsy, i will never justify police killing other citizens while at the same time i will never forgive Morsy who had one year to show any sign that he is willing to change MOI, bring retribution to the martyrs, fulfill any demands of the revolution, or even keep any promise he himself made. If anything, the tear gas and bullets that killed MB supporters was probably shipped/delivered under Morsy to be used against us. On the contrary, Morsy replaced Mubarak’s men with his own or at least attempted and did as much he could, and gave an award to Tantawi (head of SCAF) whom ironically the MB now are denouncing. The MB have accused revolutionaries of being spies of the west, thugs, “bendetta”, you name it defending the very same SCAF they are now want to rage war upon, not to mention the extensive deals they struck with the US administration to stay in power and force the neo-liberal economic agenda through IMF loan shoving it down people’s throats.

If you ask me i want nothing but prosecution to all bastards; leaders of the MB and anyone who committed a crime against another citizen, SCAF (the current one and the old one, they are all the same to me) for all massacres they committed in the name of the “national interest” , old regime Mubarak & his men and the police who massacred people since 28 Jan 2011. But even with all this, i wont praise the seeds of fascism and justify the state killing protesters, even if they are labeled terrorists and are in fact armed.

if they are terrorists and armed, then arrest them, prosecute them, but i won’t give up my rights, and embrace fascism, or my humanity in the name of “national security.” It is clear that the mandate is only to justify more crimes of the regime while letting the real perpetrator be the victims while over 14 officers have been restored to state security. It is not a mandate to “crack down on terrorists”, it is a mandate to crack down on the revolution as a whole. Those who are cheering were never part of the revolution to begin with, those who are apathetic have nothing to offer and are turning a blind eye for the “greater good”, and those who are rejecting both have no choice, but to do so out of principle.  Using violence against MB will only make them have more right to use it against anyone and especially the state, which in return will lead to more repression, so even the rights we gained in the past two years will be given up slowly (by default) in the name of the “greater good.” The state will have more “right” to arrest, torture, and even kill in the name of “national security” by “popular support”.

I don’t have a magical solution to end this dichotomy nor do i have the base power to intervene and change the discourse. All I have is my political stance and my principles that come in whole, against SCAF, MB, and Mubarak’s regime, against all perpetrators who killed and all those who hijacked the revolution!

One Night in Gaza

22 Nov

Children of the resistance, Gaza

Ever since I came back from Gaza, I haven’t felt the same. I have been through other traumatic experiences through the revolution, of course nothing like Gaza, but I am even surprised how heart-felt Gaza has hit me. It is like it shattered all my core into little pieces of sadness, not because ‘poor them, people are dying’ feeling, but because i wish we could do more as Egyptians. We are one of the most crucial countries in solving this whole “complicated issue” also known as, the deadly Zionist occupation. After all the path to Jerusalem passes through Cairo, not just symbolically or physically, but politically.

Baby rushed to Shifaa Hospital, Gaza

For Israel to exist, Palestinians must die, this is a fact proved over the last 60 years since Israel’s existence  This is not an even battle field for war, where two countries are fighting over land like most Western media, academics, and pundits insists on explaining the reason behind the deeply rooted conflict. This is a genocide, this is colonialism, this is Zionist imperialism,  where Israel together with the support of the United States administration (all of them) kill, destroy, steal, rape, and expand at any cost in order to simply sustain the Zionist state. I have always believed so, I will always do, and my trip to Gaza reassured this belief even more.

Egyptian Convoy in Gaza, Palestine

After 8 hours on the road from Cairo to Rafah, 4 hours in the Rafah border on the Egyptian side, 2 hours on the Rafah border on the Palestinian side, the 8-bus Egyptian People’s convoy reached Gaza city at Shifaa Hospital, the main and largest medical center in Gaza. We spent the entire night of 7 hours in the hospital and around it hearing the soundtrack of war, Israeli rockets and drones shaking the ground and our hearts with it every few minutes one was dropped on the civilian people of Gaza, injuring mostly children, women, and elders as I saw in the hospital.

Injured Child, Gaza

I can’t even describe in words how that was like, for even an Egyptian who spent most of the revolution on the front lines of the battle field, the war on Gaza shook me to the core of my soul on every level. It was the first time I experience how a rocket feels when it hit near by five minutes after we reached the Rafah Border Port on the Palestinian side, I literally almost fell over from the impact. Israel was attacking Gaza from sea and air while the buzzing sound of drones never stopped all the time we were there. Gaza was seemed like a ghost town, pitch black, only the light of our buses lit the road. Power kept going off every hour leaving us in a pitch black night with our uncertain future and Gazans’ resilience & courage to carry us through the intense night.

ER at Shifaa Hospital, Gaza

Once we reached Shifaa hospital we were greeted with ear-to-ear smiles from Palestinians, who were so happy to see that some Egyptians would risk their lives at a time of war to bring them solidarity. What they didn’t realize was how much each Gazans we met lifted our spirit and gave us more power to fight than any solidarity we may have brought them. I went into the hospital expected to find sad faces, miserable people who have just lost their families, but I was amazed at how every doctor, nurse, volunteer, injured patient, and family was in the highest revolutionary spirit full of strength, courage, resilience, and determination against the Zionist occupation.
It was as if every drop of blood gave them more fuel to fight and optimistic that they themselves are still alive despite the harshest conditions to live in anyone can possibly imagine. This is exactly what brought me to tears a lot of times because we, as Egypt, could be doing much more to lift the blockade on Gaza and support the resistance in every way we could; it is not only our duty, it is in our very own interest and security.

Israeli Rockets hitting Rafah, Palestine

The continuation of same-old Mubarak policies when it comes to Palestine will no longer be tolerated. Egypt post revolution especially with a president, who phrases himself on being ‘pro Palestine and revolutionary’, must and ought to take radical steps in support of Palestinians against Israel. Symbolic change like recalling our ambassador or even evicting the Israeli ambassador in Egypt was our demand since 2000 if not even before! We must cut all ties with Israel, we must open the Rafah border for all goods and people without any strings attached, and we must end the Camp David accord even with a referendum.

This is the least we could do and anything Morsi does less than those three things would simply be bogus.

The full photo album of my trip to Gaza

AUC Internal Student Politics – Camps

3 Oct

I think it is a good time to talk about “Camps” at AUC, and unravel their so-called “mystery.” The details are not important because simply it is a lot of hearsay and nothing to prove (until further notice). I can only speak about my experience at AUC and what i encountered with Camps. Camps are the AUC student government equivalent of parties; AUCians have a government of legislative, judicial, and executive branches. Camps are an “invite-only” groups, where the goals and interests are set by seniority, which may, but mostly do not have a political ideology. The idea of Camps is EXACTLY why I am against them, because a true student movement should never be based upon “Camps” that don’t have a known and identifiable goals, principles, or ideology to people at the university, they are rather based upon friendships, patronism, and lifestyle; shelalia. This is not what progressive student movements are based upon because a progressive student movement unites people based upon CAUSE/DEMANDS, which are known, identifiable, and inclusive rather than exclusive ones. What does that leave students who are “not invited” to be in camps? Almost nothing since the student political life within campus have been monopolized by “Camps.” Sometimes students attend AUC and graduate and never even know or hear that there are Camps, who are monopolizing student politics and governance. I believe this is counter productive to student politics and mobilization in general.

My so-called “attacks” on the Black Camp or ANY Camp, who insist in monopolizing student politics in the university as a Camp not as individuals or students is because THIS is exactly what will prevent and/or weaken any student movement that is based upon principles or cause like that of the organic workers Fall 2010 strike. The idea of Camps makes individual students, who don’t belong to a camp, almost have no chance in engaging in student politics (including movements) unless he or she joins a Camp. Almost all of the individuals, who took part in the 2010 fall strike, who were mostly individuals not in Camps, were either prevented, attacked, and/or excluded from giving input in this year’s “Occupy AUC,” unless he or she belonged to a Camp. This is very dangerous because it enforces the monopoly of student activism to exclusive groups that are not even known to the whole community. The presence and idea of Camps, in my opinion, is the highest undemocratic form of a student movement, which sometimes praises itself on being “revolutionary.” This is both highly problematic and dangerous to what a progressive student movement means and the ideas a revolutionary student movement represent, which this year’s “Occupy AUC” did not, and you can read why in my previous report.

This is why I support AUC Front because AUC Front is uniting people based on sectors (workers, students (from all camps or no camps at all), staff, faculty, alumni)  with common interests based on known and identifiable principles and goals. In this year’s crisis, the Front’s goals were transparency, accountability, and investigating corruption, they were willing to tackle those problems from the roots rather than from the angel of Camps and student politics, which already by default exclude many other people on campus, who care about the cause/demand and willing to mobilize. I don’t want the idea of Camps to monopolize student politics period, and this time the Black Camp was the monopolizer even if they “allowed” other Camps to play a role like the red camp or others. Thus, it becomes a Camp struggle and NOT a student struggle nor a student movement, and who has a strong Camp would basically rule with an unknown, unidentified, and exclusive ideology.

Because AUC is different in its dynamics and free space from other universities in Egypt, AUC is capable of pushing all boundaries in student mobilization, and lead the whole student movement to an entire new level. This won’t happen unless Camps are either dissolved or become more open and inclusive. If anything we learned from the revolution so far is that the dictatorship of the minority is as bad as the dictatorship of a tyrant. The Camps usually revolve around a few group of friends leading that Camp to where ever these individuals see fit. The idea could be used for good, but so far it has divided people, isolated them, and used substitutionism as an elitist method of struggle. A strong student movement at AUC must be open to others, it must be public with its principles and goals known and identified to all, and it must be inclusive to all members of the community who are willing to fight for the cause.

We MUST all put hidden interests and personal glories aside in any real attempt of fixing the core problems at the AUC. These problems are categorized in severe corruption and unjust practices by the administration towards many sectors of the AUC community and affect all of them, not only students. We have to expose those Camps so they are known to the rest of the community and I invite all of the Camps to reveal their identity and make their principles and goals public, if there are any, to unravel this AUC worst-kept “mysteries” once and for all. I say this with every caring concern about what is happening at AUC, not just for the sake of AUC, but for the sake of the student movement as a whole and the revolution.

Power of the people is greater than people in power.
Long live the student movement!

The Festival of Flool #EgyElections

17 May

During the Egyptian Circus represented as “The First Democratic Presidential Election in the Arab Word,” which is untrue by the way, the first was in Mauritania in 2008, you will encounter the funniest and most creative ways people have used to expose the flool (figures from the Mubarak regime) candidates in attempt to prevent them from being “elected.” As many people have zero hope in this fake-democracy packaged in a ballot box, Egyptian people have always resorted to humor to make a point in a time of desperate need for counter-media.

The wide range of mediums used to expose the most popular flool Shafik and Mousa beside the “Spare,” also known as Ikhwan’s 2nd choice Morsy, are photos, cartoons, songs, YouTube videos, and my favorite graffiti

Exhibition A: The “Spare” Mohamed Morsy of the Ikhwan, who came as a second choice after business tycoon Al Shater was disqualified.

Morsy is your “Spare” president, the puppet of Ikhwan

  Morsy as a “Spare” LOL

Exhibition B: “The Pullover is Not Over” represented in Ahmed Shafik, the luckiest last prime minister Mubarak appoints before enjoying a 5 stars stay at a 5 stars hospital. He is the funniest and easiest to make fun of and expose. Every time he speaks, I feel like comedy movies could be drafted. His posters almost every where have been either ripped or flool written all over them, but my favorite is the flool song and graffiti.

Graffiti stencil saying “Vote for Shafik for an even bloodier camels battle” referring to Shafik’s presence in Mubarak’s cabinet during the bloody 2 Feb 2011

This is mimicking the famous Om Kalthoum song saying that the East build civilizations where Shafik built the airport himself on his own.

Shafik flool and Zionist

Exhibition C: “Mr. X” represented in the most obvious flool, the candidate of all elite in Egypt including Sawiras and I am sure if USA and Israel had a love child, it would be Moussa with a smaller frog face. He has received the most anti-flool propaganda. It is a tie between Shafik and Mousa, but since Mousa is more likely to succeed so the concentration is more when it comes to the obvious level of floolness.

Mousa flooling around back in the day

Cartoon by Ashraf Omar depicting Mosa looking in the mirror trying to convince himself he is not flool.

“The students of Mubarak can not be president, no flool”

It will be “kossa” a term meaning zucchini, but usually means rigged

This video can not be translated because the humor is just too relevant to Egyptian slang that it wouldn’t make sense in English but trust me, it is the funniest thing !!

Mona: Why Do You Hate Us?

25 Apr

Women's march in Tahrir #April20

At any given moment in the Egyptian revolution, or the Arab Spring for that matter, the question of women or the role of women arises. I cannot recall the number of emails, and questions I usually get, mostly from foreign journalists, about the “role of women in the Egyptian revolution.” My answer is (if i ever answer at all) usually the same and consist of something like “women have been fighting in the forefront of the struggle paving the way to this revolution. They have been beaten, tortured, stripped naked, imprisoned, sacked from their jobs and much more just as much as men if not more including getting their virginity checked. However, they are not acting as one block of women, but rather as revolutionaries or ordinary people fighting for the revolution’s demands: freedom, dignity, social equality.”

It might take some aliens to not understand this, especially as an Egyptian, even for an Egyptian living abroad who visits Egypt a lot for some people. If any of these journalists who usually ask this question happen to have joined one protest or one strike, he or she would immediately know that women are the backbone of this revolution. In my experience, the most militant, radical, brave people I encountered in this revolution happened to be women. Samira Ibrahim, Aida Seif Al Dawla, Layla Sweif, Rasha Azab, Salma Said, Mona Mina, Mary Daniel, Tahrir girl, to name a few, not to mention all the mothers, sisters, and wives of martyrs and working class women.

This post is not supposed to convince you how courageous women are in the Middle East, or how they are fighting for freedom, minimum wage, social equality, or good education, because that is shown everyday through the heroic stories that the western press fails to cover, but Egyptians encounter them on a daily basis. You can view some stories of brave ordinary women here. This post is rather a response to the disgraceful, one-dimensional, article “Why Do They Hate Us?” by Mona El Tahawy.

Titles like “Why do they hate us?” can only describe Geroge-Bush dichotomies of “them” versus “us” paradigms, where the making of the “other” into a monster can only add to “our” vulnerability and righteousness. I never thought that this dichotomy could be used as an argument for feminism, but the astonishing Mona El Tahawy have found a way. In her article, she based her whole vague-over-generalized-orientalist argument of why women are oppressed in the Middle East to a simple reason of “because they hate us.” To give Mona the benefit of the doubt, as I skimmed through the title before reading the first paragraph about a woman so unmoved by sex with her husband, I imagined an article written on why dictatorships hate women or why exploitative systems hate women and turn them into objects, even if it is not about love or hate in my opinion, but I was imagining this to at least make the article readable for me after the disturbing title, the horribly chosen picture to accompany the topic, and the overt opening. Naive I was to think that Mona El Tahawy could write something I might slightly agree with given her history in writing about “women issues in the Middle East.”

Her sole argument on why women are oppressed in the Middle East, since this is a special place in the world where only backward thinking can be found, is because men and/or Arab society hate women. What is very troubling is her belief that she is the “voice” for so many unheard women, who are oppressed and beaten by their husbands or shunned by the patriarchal Arab societies. She is the beacon of hope for Arab Muslim women living the male-dominated Middle East forced to wear the niqab and do slave work at home. Not only does she believe that she is speaking for these women, but she believes that she is one of the few (if not the only) who is brave, eloquent, and educated enough to vocalize these suppressed voices to the Western media like FP, BBC, CNN, who are of course incapable to reach these suppressed creatures, Middle Eastern women.

I think the only factual thing Mona brings up is that there is discrimination against women more in the Middle East than in other countries, but she blames it on all the wrong reasons. She brings all statistics and backed-up research on how women are subject to unequal laws, genital mutilation, sexual harassment, domestic violence, and rape, etc. I am not minimizing or dismissing these facts at all and I do encourage and believe discussion about these crimes as healthy and the only way to move forward is by acknowledging the problem. Many who have criticized Mona’s article get accused that we are defending the actions of discrimination against women or simply denying it and that couldn’t be farthest from the truth in understanding the fundamental problem with Mona’s argument in the first place.

The fundamental problem of Mona’s essay is the context and framework of how she analyzes why women in the Middle East are oppressed and the only reason she could give is because men and Arab societies (culturally and religiously) hate women. This is offensive to most women I know, who read the article and shared the same view. Women in the Middle East are not oppressed by men out of male dominance, they are oppressed by regimes (who happened to be men in power) and systems of exploitation (which exploit based on class not gender). Having women in power in a flawed system will not “fix” the problem either. We had a women’s quota in Mubarak’s parliament, did that change anything for women in reality? It was all ink on paper. Even after revolution, women are consistently used for political grounds by crony political parties. Explaining why women are oppressed without touching on any of the historical, political, or economical aspects of Arab countries, which are not all the same as she tends to generalize in her article, couldn’t be more delusional than this piece.

The answer is in the picture FP used as a “sexy” caption alongside a sexist article full of disgrace to brave Arab women including one of the bravest in that picture. Did Mona El Tahawy ask herself, “what would this brave young girl who exposed an army think of what I write about her oppression?” I don’t think Mona is even capable of this thinking given her stance. Did this girl feel hated by those men in uniform because she is a woman? or did she feel betrayed by the men who were supposed to protect her as part of their duty? She was standing for social justice, freedom, human rights, she stood against an army for Egypt as a whole, men, women, Christians, Muslims, young, old, Nubians, and immigrants. It is hard to believe that if she had a choice she would only choose women because “they (men) hate us (women).” Mona, on the other hand would disagree. I don’t know how the girl felt, I don’t know how she feels about this article and nobody does except her.

I am not here to tell you how every woman in the Arab world, which is a very big divers place, full of all kinds of women, feel about men and about this article. I can only speak about my feelings and my experience. Mona El Tahawy’s article does not represent me. I am an Egyptian American Muslim woman, who was raised to Egyptian parents, spent all my childhood in Egypt, studied high school and partial college in the US and now living in Egypt since 2008 and I am happily married to an amazing Egyptian man, who loves me and doesn’t hate me because I am a woman.

Our society is far from fair towards many groups not just towards women. My fight and our revolution’s heart lay in this struggle itself, to have every Egyptian living a decent life, living a humane life, and for some to simply live. For decades, Egyptians in all sectors of society have suffered the iron fist and corruption of dictators ruling Egypt and still ruling them. This transcended through generations and found its place in almost every household and institution (with relative degrees). How can all this very complicated complex be summed into a zero-sum equation of men versus women, love versus hate? It is much more complicated than that, but Mona doesn’t bother to mention any of this, but portrays the Middle East as if it is an anomaly, where the only measure of women success or women equality is how many seats she got in parliament or if we will ever see a woman president of Egypt. Does Mona El Tahawy know that nearly 3,000 Egyptian women workers started one of the first Mahalla’s strikes (in the recent decade) in December 2006, when they started chanting, “where are the men, here are the women!” Which paved the way to the revolution that is inspiring and shocking to the world right now? of course that wouldn’t fit into the perception of the average American Foreign Policy reader, who is used to images of American soldiers with guns going to “liberate” Afghani and Iraqi women from Muslim extremists. Simply, Mona’s audience are neither Arab women nor most women who took part in this revolution. To give you an idea, here are some examples of responses to this disgraceful article. Some written by Arab women, who agree Mona only represents herself in that article.

Not Hatred, But Love! Dear Mona

Us and Them: On Helpless Women and Orientalist Imagery

Dear Mona ElTahawy: You Don’t Represent “Us”

I Don’t Really Think They Hate Us!

In response to Mona Eltahawy’s hate argument

On Muslim-Arab issues and the Danger of Aiding the Neo-Liberal Colonialist Agenda

Hatred and misogyny in the Middle East, a response to Mona el Tahawy

Oh, Mona!

Let’s Talk About

Debating the War on Women

Mona el Tahawy and the Transnational Fulul al Nidham

A Critique of Mona Eltahawy’s Perception of Misogyny in the Middle East

Revolution Continues – ارفع كل رايات النصر

26 Jan

 

Revolution Continues - ارفع كل رايات النصر

 

On the first anniversary of the revolution, hundreds of thousands of Egyptians take to the streets echoing the same chants and demands from last year as if nothing have changed because nothing have changed. The only difference is that today was a record breaking numbers of protesters on the streets demanding end of military rule. More people took to the streets today all over Egypt than even Feb 11. The message was clear; we demand change, we demand the downfall of regime, we are continuing revolution until victory

 

January Flashback

2 Jan

 

 

These days last year, we were running from city to city protesting sectarian strife post the deadly bombing of Alexandria church 20 minutes into the new year. We chanted death to Habib El Adly, we demanded justice and to hold those in power accountable for not protecting churches, and repressing us for asking for our dignity and equality. While crackdowns on Tunisian revolutionaries were taking place, activists in Egypt were watching closely hoping for victory for what was known then as the #Sidibouzid up-rise. As fellow Arabs calling for freedom, we stood in solidarity with Tunisians in their fight hoping the domino effect would hit us soon and save us from our dictatorship misery. On January 2nd, we called for a stand with candles in Talaat Harb sq in solidarity with Tunisians that soon enough turned into a protest against police and sectarianism. The stand was held by only tens of supporters and was shortly raided by state police, telling us no one can stand here, four of my friends got arrested while Ramy Raoof and I ran down on Talaat Harb st escaping police after my phone was almost broken by a police officer when I was trying to take a video.

 

 

 

We regrouped with more supporters on the way, and we marched down the streets of Talaat Harb chanting “To Mohamed tell Bolus, tomorrow Egypt will be Tunisia,” a chant that combined Muslim and Christian unity in the face of sectarianism for a better free Egypt in support of the Tunisian revolution. We marched down Ramsis st and immediately we were met by hundreds of riot police, and finally cordoned for nearly 8 hours without anyone allowed in or out of the cordon for any reason.

 

 

Along with Mona Seif, Ramy Raoof, Haitham Mohamedain, Aida Seif, and many other brave souls, we stood there chanting, tweeting, never giving up, and telling those officers, “Tomorrow when the revolution comes, it will put you in prison.” The night ended, we went home, and protested again in Shubra in solidarity with our Christian brothers & sisters at El Massara church sit-in, where I also was cordoned for nearly 10 hours by riot police while thousands clashed with police on Shubra st.

 

January 7th, the Coptic Christian holiday, was spent differently. Muslims and non-Muslims went to form human chains around churches on midnight for Christians to have a safe mass. Later that day, we stood in black with candles on Kasr El Nile bridge mourning the loss of our Christian brothers and sisters from the Alexandria church bombing.

A year later to think that we had multiple churches attacks, whether in Imbaba in April or Aswan in October, post a revolution that happened only weeks after the kind of solidarity & unity shown post Alexandria church bombing is incomprehensible, but explainable. It is explainable by one reason and one reason only because the regime is still alive and kicking. The people STILL demand the removal of regime. Sectarian strife has been one of the many tools used by the regime to divide and rule people, so it is not a surprise that attacks against minorities do still happen, but unfortunately, they happen at a greater loss and more viciously.

 

 

Who can ever forget that the same army who is supposed to protect its civilians could run-over Christians with military tanks? The loss of Mina Daniel and others makes you wonder at what cost will we win this revolution? The answer is clear and seen everyday and in every revolutionary’s eyes in Tahrir willing to die for Egypt to live.

I have no doubt that with this kind of support, courage, and bravery, we will free Egypt from SCAF, which is the same regime that killed and repressed us since 1952. This year, the year of freedom, as I am calling it, will be different and it already has since we started the year celebrating in Tahrir, Muslims & Christians, hand in hand against SCAF. Welcome 2012…

2011: The Year of Heroes

31 Dec

It would be an understatement if one says 2011 was the year of change. The year of revolutions, the year of power of the people, the year of realizing yes we do have the power to overcome and triumph. What has not happened in 2011? Families battles, world disasters, Arab revolutions, global movements, personal struggles & successes, and of course love, all took place in 2011, and sometimes all at once. I saw death, I lived in Tahrir, I witnessed miracles, I went to places never thought were possible, I sprayed graffiti of Khaled Said on the gates of interior ministry, I lived. There are no words that can describe my pride and honor of having been part of the roots of the Egyptian revolution and still fighting for its victory. The days when we protested in tens in a cordon surrounded by thousands of riot police in front of the press syndicate or on the sidewalk somewhere, now seem now only like a small picture in an album book on an old shelf somewhere. From the start of 2011, Alexandria church bombing 20 minutes into the year, this small picture forever changed. People poured into the streets fighting sectarian strife and showing Egyptian unity. Soon enough along came the step-down of Ben Ali, ex-dictator of Tunisia, 10 days later we were in Tahrir demanding the removal of regime, and 18 days further Mubarak, the dictator who terrorized us for decades finally stepped down. The sweetest moment of victory ever short-lived, knowing what we experienced for months after and until now by the extension of Mubarak’s dictatorship under SCAF. So many people around me are disappointed and discouraged with how things are turning out since Mubarak stepped down, but being part of how things were before the revolution makes me so much more hopeful now. I always like to have the big-picture perspective on most events even in my personal life, and what I see now for Egypt is nothing less than greatness and unprecedented achievements in 2011 despite all the massacres and SCAF’s iron fist on Egypt.

Pictures speak louder than words so instead of telling you all the events that made the Egyptian revolutionaries my heroes of 2011. Below is the year of the revolution in pictures highlighting the most powerful images I chose for 2011. This is why there is hope, as long as we are breathing, we will fight for our freedom, social equality, and dignity. We die for freedom, but we live on hope & resistance. May 2012 be the year of freedom. Revolution until victory.

NO MORE FEAR! – Jan28
Nasr City مدينة نصر

NDP ON FIRE (for 3 days) – Jan29
Cairo Burns

The Bastard IS OUT – Feb11
Celebrations in Tahrir Square - February 11, 2011

WE RAIDED STATE SECURITY – March5
وثائق دمرها أمن الدولة

WE WON’T FORGET OUR MARTYRS – May6
Martyrs الشهداء

THE BLOOD OF ATTEF YEHYIA – May15
Egyptian Blood

KHALED SAID GRAFFITI ON MOI – Jun6
MOI Graffiti

BATTLE FOR MARTYRS – June28
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Police cracks down on martyrs' families in Tahrir الداخلية تضرب عائلات الشهداء بقنابل الغاز وخراطيش الرش والرصاص المطاطي

WE ARE BACK IN TAHRIR, WON’T GIVE UP! – July8 sit-in
Faces from Tahrir

ARMY RAID ON TAHRIR – Aug1: Ramadan 1st
Tahrir attack

FLAGMAN – Aug21
"Ahmed El-Shahat" The man who removed the Israeli flag from Israel Embassy in Egypt - #FlagMan

ONE DAY REV – Sept9

Independent Judiciary March

Ultras Ahly  التراس الاهلي

rain of tear gas bombs at protesters at Nahdet Masr Square | وابل من قنابل الغاز على المتظاهرين في ميدان نهضة مصر

MASPERO MASSACRE – Oct9

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مسيرة للتنديد بمذبحة ماسبيرو

NOVEMBER UPRISING – Nov19

Tear Gas قنابل الغاز

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OCCUPY CABINET – Dec16

Army Soldier with a dirty gesture

Protest like Egyptians

Army Officer points a gun at a fallen protester

Army Raids in Tahrir

Revolutionary in Qasr el Einy

The two walls in Tahrir

There so much more ..but one video says it all. SCAF MUST BE EXECUTED IN 2012!!!

With all the painful images above, I am not depressed nor worried. I have seen the strength, courage, and bravery of the Egyptian revolutionaries. We never stop fighting, we never give up, we will continue until victory and I have no doubt that we will EXECUTE SCAF.

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